An adjustable rate mortgage (ARM), sometimes known as a variable-rate mortgage, is a home loan with an interest rate that adjusts over time to reflect market conditions. Once the initial fixed-period is completed, a lender will apply a new rate based on the index – the new benchmark interest rate – plus a set margin amount, to calculate the new rate.

With an adjustable rate mortgage, the interest rate may go up or down. Many ARMs will start at a lower interest rate than fixed rate mortgages. This initial rate may stay the same for months, one year, or a few years. When this introductory period is over, your interest rate will change and the amount of your payment is likely to go up.

Adjustable-rate mortgages are being welcomed into homes again. Many homeowners shunned adjustable-rate mortgages, often called ARMs, during and after the recession, but according to an analysis from.

What Is Variable Rate Variable interest rates are often tied to the prime rate, but might also be tied to the treasury bill rate or Libor. In certain economic conditions, a variable interest rate, or variable APR , is better because it allows you to pay off your credit card or loan balance at a lower cost when the index rate is down.

Today’s low rates for adjustable-rate mortgages. An amount paid to the lender, typically at closing, in order to lower the interest rate. Also known as mortgage points or discount points. One point equals one percent of the loan amount (for example, 2 points on a $100,000 mortgage would equal $2,000).

Several benchmark mortgage rates climbed today. The average rates on 30-year fixed and 15-year fixed mortgages both were.

An ARM, or Adjustable Rate Mortgage, is a variable rate mortgage. Unlike a Fixed Rate Mortgage, the interest rate on an ARM loan adjusts to the market after a set period, usually every year but sometimes on a monthly basis. The change in the interest rate depends on the benchmark or index it is tied to plus the ARM margin.

Several key mortgage rates climbed higher today. The average rates on 30-year fixed and 15-year fixed mortgages both trended.

4 | Consumer Handbook on Adjustable-Rate Mortgages What is an ARM? An adjustable-rate mortgage di ers from a xed-rate mortgage in many ways. Most importantly, with a xed-rate mortgage, the interest rate stays the same during the life of the loan. With an ARM, the interest rate changes periodically, usually in relation to

3 Year Arm Mortgage Rate Adjustable-Rate Mortgages Overview. More lenders and borrowers are seeking out the advantages of adjustable-rate mortgages. In many market conditions, ARM rates are often lower than fixed-rate mortgages, and for certain borrowers, ARM advantages more closely meet their needs.

Typically, this cap is 2-3% above the Start Rate on a loan with an initial. For example, a 5/1 Hybrid ARM may have a cap structure of.

An adjustable rate mortgage is a loan that bases its interest rate on an index. The index is typically the Libor rate, the fed funds rate, or the one-year Treasury bill.